Sweden - Sail Charter International

Sailing in Sweden

Sailing the inner northern seas: the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Bothnia, is an amazing experience. Sheltered from the Atlantic, experience Sweden’s gorgeous unspoiled coastline sprinkled with archipelagos, island life Swedish-style, undisturbed nature, sheltered waters, clean beaches, your very own deserted island, or islands and coastal fishing villages with fabulous seafood restaurants, bars and activity stop-offs.

The sailing season in Sweden is July-September and darkness falls for just 3 hours a day in high summer. So there is almost constant daylight as you sail the waters of the north, south, east and west coasts. Sweden has a very warm and dry climate despite its northern latitude.

You can sail the waters of the Gulf of Bothnia in Swedish Lapland and go onshore to experience the weird and wonderful geology of the High Coast from the east coast of Northern Sweden. Or why not opt for the Stockholm archipelago and the islands of Finnhamn, Grinda, Utö and Sandhamn, all of which have restaurants, bars and nature and adventure activities.

The Stockholm Archipelago

Stockholm is the Swedish capital and the country’s cultural, political and economic center. The Stockholm archipelago is a vast system of islands and islets in which to sail. Popular islands in the archipelago are: Möja, Runmarö, Nämdö, Dalarö, Finnhamn, Grinda, Husarö, Ingarö, Isö, Ljusterö, Nämndö, Rödlöga, Tynninge, Utö, Svartsö and Värmdö. The islands are close together and unaffected by tides so sailing in this area is simple and relaxing. Gothenburg is Sweden’s largest port and a good starting point from which to explore the Swedish West coast. The West coast is the sunniest part of Sweden and good weather is common here during the summer. Countless islands lie within reach of Gothenburg, but some interesting destinations are: Marstrand, Tjorn, Vinga, Rönnäng, Smögen, Skagen, Åstol, Mollosund and Gullholmen.

Gotland and Aland Islands

Gotland is a large island that lies in the Baltic Sea between Sweden and Latvia. It is a unique island and a pleasant sailing spot. It is rich in history with 94 medieval churches and many prehistoric sites. There are also sandy beaches suitable for swimming. The Aland Islands are situated between Sweden and Finland – they are technically Finnish territory but Swedish is the common language. They lie in the Baltic Sea at the entrance to the Gulf of Bothnia, and consist of over 300 islands and 6,000 islets and skerries. Mariehamn (Finland) is the best starting point for exploration of this archipelago.