Croatia - Sail Charter International

Sailing in Croatia

Croatia Yacht Charter:

With over 1,000 islands, sailing in Croatia can provide an excellent and unforgettable experience.
Croatian sailing holidays generally consist of a bareboat or skippered bareboat charter, this means chartering a boat, with or without a skipper.

Croatia has the biggest charter market worldwide and is roughly divided into four wonderful sailing areas:

 – north (around Pula and the northern Brijuni Islands)

 – upper central (from Zadar to Sibenik and the famous Kornati National Park)

 – lower central (between Split and Makarska the larger central islands of Brac, Vis, Hvar, Milna)

 – south (around Dubrovnik and down to the wonderful Montenegro).

You can charter yachts from Split, Dubrovnik, Trogir, Biograd, Sukosan, Rogoznica, Primosten, Zadar, Pula and many other marinas in Croatia.

Pula

Istria’s largest city, Pula brims with historical sights, the grandest of which is certainly the Roman amphitheater. Locally known as the Arena, it is one of the best-preserved Roman Imperial buildings in the world, testifying to the turbulent and millennia-long history of this region. The enormous natural harbor has been used since early Antiquity, and it served as the main naval harbor of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy.

In the immediate vicinity of Pula are the Brijuni Islands, once among the most prestigious summer resorts visited by emperors, presidents, world leaders and stars of Hollywood’s golden age. For thousands of years Pula has been both a center of Istria and a gateway to it, one of the ideal starting points for an exploration of natural, cultural and culinary riches of the peninsula that is often described as an untouched, pristine version of Tuscany. 

Pula has the world’s largest amphorae find site. More than two thousand amphorae were found in the waters around Pula, and a permanent exhibition of these unusual vessels, used in antiquity for storing and transporting olive oil, wine, salted fish and preserved fruit, can be visited in the underground passages of the Pula Amphitheatre. The renowned National Geographic Traveler recommended a visit to Istria and its capital of Pula to its readers, ranking them among the 10 most attractive travel destinations in the world.

Šibenik

As the third-largest city in Dalmatia, Šibenik is a strongly recommended destination on the spectacular stretch of Adriatic coastline. Šibenik is a city of sun, sea and stone, making it an unforgettable place to visit or begin your sailing journey in. The “Mandalina” Marina is located within close proximity of the town center, which is halfway between two international Airports, Zadar and Split. It only takes around 45 to 55 minutes to reach Sibenik’s Marina from either one of these airports.

Not only is the marina known to be one of the safest ports in the area due to being in a very wind sheltered location, the old town is an amazing place to visit. It’s great choice of exquisite restaurants has been attracting tourists from all over the world. Not to mention the Krka national park, a magical attraction with swimmable waterfalls, being just a short trip away from the marina.

Split

In 293 AD Roman Emperor Diocletian ordered the construction – on the ruins of the Greek city of Aspalathos and near Salona, an ancient urban center – of a magnificent palace in which he would spend his final years. The town of Split as we know it today expanded from Diocletian’s Palace, the world’s best-preserved palace from late antiquity. Split is now the capital of Dalmatia, captivating visitors with its Mediterranean charm and majestic architecture. According to recent theories, Diocletian’s Palace was more than just a place of leisure, but housed a wool -processing facility that funded the former Emperor’s court.

Modern Split is most closely identified with popular music and sports, earning Diocletian’s city the sobriquets of “the most musical Croatian city” and “the sports-maddest city in the world”.

It is from the Marina Split that the Split Lungomare begins; this longest promenade in the Adriatic – and certainly one of the most beautiful – will take you to the famous and diverse beaches of this “beautiful, sun-kissed flower of the Mediterranean,” as another popular song puts it. Split is home to the Museum of Croatian Archaeological Monuments, the oldest museum in Croatia, founded in 1820. The museum houses priceless artefacts of ancient cultures which left their mark here.

Dubrovnik

In the south of Dalmatia, where the string of Adriatic islands ends and the open sea begins, at the foothills of Srđ hill lies the pearl of the Adriatic, a UNESCO World Heritage Site that dates back to the 7th century. The city of Dubrovnik, which offers a surpassingly rich cultural heritage and a bewildering array of visitor services.
The coastal area of the Dubrovnik region, comprising the islands of Korčula, Mljet, Lastovo and the Elaphite archipelago, as well as the Pelješac peninsula makes Dubrovnik an ideal starting point for a complete boating adventure.

The cuisine of the region, with its Mediterranean, Oriental and Continental influences, will provide unforgettable gastronomic delights for even the most demanding of palates, while visitors’ thirst for activity holidays will be quenched by numerous sports activities which can be enjoyed here – from diving and exploring Dubrovnik’s undersea world and protected underwater archaeological sites, to tennis, free-climbing, and exciting adventures in Prevlaka Park.

The entrance to the Rector’s Palace (Knežev Dvor), the most important public building in Dubrovnik, which used to house the Republic’s government and its Rector, one can read the indicative inscription Obliti privatorum publica curate (“Forget private affairs, take care of public ones”). The last flash of Dubrovnik’s independence flared in 1813 during a short-lived uprising against French rule. The uprising, led by Đivo de Natali, ended with the entry of Austrian troops.